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*                        For engineers that moonlight as artists and artists that moonlight as engineers                                         *
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An act of benevolent shaming: re-fabricated moon rocks

3d software, 3d printed plastic filament, cut vinyl, paint, text, podium.
2012
Artwork by [user-name]

"An act of benevolent shaming" is an act of recompense for past transgressions and absent-mindedness: the re-fabrication of the lost moon rocks.

Over 840 lbs of soil samples and rocks were brought to earth by the Apollo astronauts. These are distinct from objects which have, unaided by human endeavor, otherwise made their way earthward (chunks of the moon, for example, dislodged by meteorites). Of these samples, an alarming and embarrassing amount have "gone missing". Inspired by images of “Lunar Sample 71575”, for instance, nestled amongst its brethren, I am attempting to put the band back together again.

There are 12 moon rocks. 12 like the number of the apostles, or inches in a foot, or the hours in a half day: a form of marking that dates from a time when math and fiction shared more common roots.

The rocks were fabricated using a 3d printer. The models were created using a mix of applications, including Blender, Sketchup, and netfabb Studio. From bits to solid forms: a sort of modern alchemy. There is also a stylized cut-vinyl crater on the wall. Brand awarness and logos have of course now made their way to the moon.

"An act of benevolent shaming" is part of an ongoing project which combines images, objects, and text.  Titled "Moonfarming - an Illustrated Encyclopedia" the project is an experment in 3d storytelling, exploring nostalgia, data, and the common need for a place of fantasy.

net.2.2

digital glitch image printed with inkjet on fiber paper, 13 x 19 in, edition of 12
2010
Artwork by Kevin Benisvy

These works were made from an image of a tattered net that I took via digital capture at the Boston waterfront near Government Center. It was glitched in a text editor with specific interventions in the code made to achieve desired visual effects.


Most glitch artists recognize the glitch as something broken and beautiful within our machine creations which rises to the surface, unless by intention, generally at a time when it is unanticipated and undesired. It is clear to me that the glitch speaks to our humanity, and its reflection within our creations. It recognizes a human quality - something generally regarded as untouchable by machines. It is an error, a sign that something has gone wrong, perhaps a reflection of our own human primal urges - our gut instincts and our unconscious frustrations.


Through methodological and phenomenological approaches alike, I explore a number of themes to which glitch can speak including our limitations of understanding, which we attempt to remedy by continually devising cleverer methods of compression and consolidation of data, the challenge of gender identity, and our means of communication, trade, and expression of ownership. I use a method of "incorrect editing" of files, and alter them to my own aesthetic preferences in a celebratory act which seeks ultimately to use glitch to find a medium between the information experience and the human experience, and a more honest understanding of our machine interactions in recognition of what we put into our technology.

net.1.2

digital glitch image printed with inkjet on fiber paper, 13 x 19 in, edition of 12
2010
Artwork by Kevin Benisvy

These works were made from an image of a tattered net that I took via digital capture at the Boston waterfront near Government Center. It was glitched in a text editor with specific interventions in the code made to achieve desired visual effects.

Most glitch artists recognize the glitch as something broken and beautiful within our machine creations which rises to the surface, unless by intention, generally at a time when it is unanticipated and undesired. It is clear to me that the glitch speaks to our humanity, and its reflection within our creations. It recognizes a human quality - something generally regarded as untouchable by machines. It is an error, a sign that something has gone wrong, perhaps a reflection of our own human primal urges - our gut instincts and our unconscious frustrations.

Through methodological and phenomenological approaches alike, I explore a number of themes to which glitch can speak including our limitations of understanding, which we attempt to remedy by continually devising cleverer methods of compression and consolidation of data, the challenge of gender identity, and our means of communication, trade, and expression of ownership. I use a method of "incorrect editing" of files, and alter them to my own aesthetic preferences in a celebratory act which seeks ultimately to use glitch to find a medium between the information experience and the human experience, and a more honest understanding of our machine interactions in recognition of what we put into our technology.

Lincolnshire Poacher

Printed vinyl, wood, plastic, FM transmitter, radios, audio
2009
Artwork by [user-name]

“- Shortwave numbers stations are a social experiment being conducted by the aliens.
- Actually they are mostly tenticle-enlargement spam, but we don't have the proper char-set support yet. Hopefully this will be included in Vista.(1)”

Lincolnshire Poacher combines a number of my fascinations: Google maps, text, sound, nature, camouflage, humor(2), and enigma. Its subject is the most famous of the cold war era Number Stations(3): the similarly named Lincolnshire Poacher. The Lincolnshire Poacher broadcast for over 30 years always using the same format: the (sampled) voice of an English woman reading out sets of 5 digit numbers, prefaced by 10 repetitions of one set of 5 numbers and bookended by several bars of the English folk song “The Lincolnshire Poacher”. I am intrigued by Number Stations for a variety of reasons, particularly their reductivist use of text to pass secrets by the most public of methods.

The piece’s main element is a vector drawing based on the Google maps aerial photograph of Akrotiri, Cyprus: the presumed location of the Lincolnshire Poacher. An orange dot on the drawing marks the likely location of the station's transmitter believed to have been operated by the British Secret Intelligence Service. A series of additional orange dots within the exhibit lead to the location of a sound piece: a recreation of an actual broadcast by the Lincolnshire Poacher station made in October 2004.

I have been fascinated, if not obsessed, with Google maps for almost two years. The resulting undertakings are a reflection of my examinations of mimetic process, a sense of unrequited wanderlust, and a latent fondness for the cold war's quaintly stylized tropes of aggression: poisoned umbrellas tips, modems in the stratosphere(4), and Number Stations. A reflection of my own peripatetic history (I am a multinational and have travelled widely) Lincolnshire Poacher is simultaneously symptomatic of my rooted present. I am now an armchair traveler who indulges my yearnings through virtual wandering in forbidden spaces.

1 - Comments about an August 2006 article on Slashdot about VoIP Number Stations: http://it.slashdot.org/article.pl?sid=06/08/05/216229

2 - I was pleased to discover during the course of my research that there is a type of artisanal cheese named Lincolnshire Poacher.

3 - for additional information about number stations see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Numbers_station

4 - sputnik

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