COLLISIONcollective

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*                        For engineers that moonlight as artists and artists that moonlight as engineers                                         *
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Schrödinger

LEDs, copper, plexiglas, wood, and fur
2013
Schrödinger

Schrödinger is a study in frustrated observation. In as much as the contents reference the original quantum mechanical thought experiment of Schrödinger’s Cat*, this is intended to complement the observational paradox of the piece as a whole and my musing on the experiential roll of art. In sum, there is nothing to see here. The closer you inspect the piece, the lower the lights will fall and your reflection will obscure the contents.

* Featuring a cat who may or may not have suffered death as a result of external observation. 

efuller.net/schrodinger

Verbing Man

Wood, steel, plastic (acrylic mirrors and foam)
2012
Verbing Man @COLLISION18:present

 

Verbing Man is the latest in a series of animation devices which I call Image Engines. It was designed to maximize interactivity. It is an animated sculpture which, like a zoetrope, uses persistence of vision to create an illusion of continuous motion from a series of “frames”.  Verbing Man offers unprecedented interactivity for this type of sculpture due to the use of 12 poseable artist mannequins as frames, making it possible for the animation to be repeatedly altered and remade by viewers. Further, the mannequins are arranged on a platter which viewers rotate by means of a crank in order to bring the animation to life.

Verbing Man uses new materials to reinvent a 19th century technology in which an inner circle of mirrors was used to animate, in reflection, an outer circle of flat images mounted on the same rotating wheel. Verbing Man is likely the largest praxinoscope ever made with a wheel diameter of 4 feet instead of the more typical 4 inches. For technical reasons, it is also likely that this is the first time a praxinoscope has been used to animate three dimensional objects. The use of mirrors instead of strobe lights or slits means that animations are visible in almost any lighting condition, from candle light to full sun, and from all sides at almost any angle.

Hidden Marriage

Wood, polymer clay, gold-leaf, mosses, lichens, liverwort, foam, water, mist makers, felt, lamps.
2012
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]
Artwork by [user-name]

Hidden Marriage is an extraordinary piece of furniture housing a marriage of hidden interactions.

Visitors encounter a familiar form, an elegant coffee table, but its surface is bursting with growth. Woodland natives, the spore-producing cryptogams (Greek κρυπτός kryptos, "hidden" + γαμέω, gameein, "to marry") - mosses, lichens, liverworts, selaginellas, ferns - are watered by constant veils of mist. Creeping in from the table's edge to mingle with the mosses are lichen-like forms dressed in the livery of the table, black and gold. Small, gold figures walk in the miniature landscape.

Visitors are encouraged to sit or kneel at the table, either in contemplation or conversation. 

The piece is a reminder of our inner primordial forests where the rational and the irrational mix to make something new, perhaps over a cup of coffee.

This piece is part of the Wonderlust series, and its evolution can be found here: http://elaket.org/wonderlust.html

The Looking Glass; Contracted & Expanding

Brass & Copper plate, wood, latex paint, nails (fasteners), Blackberry Playbook tablet computers
2012
The Looking Glass; Contracted & Expanding
The Looking Glass; Contracted & Expanding
The Looking Glass; Contracted & Expanding @COLLSION18:present

The Looking Glass; Contracted & Expanding attempts to function as a critical cross-section of contemporary portraiture and the portrayal of identity within the modern age.  Founded upon the premise of the video blog as being the most modern form of portraiture, the piece seeks to investigate socio-cultural differences between past and present and how such differences have been articulated through new-media portraits.  For starters, the video blog portrait, due to its ubiquitous nature and limitless accessibility, actively challenges our conceptions of subjective and collective significance that predecessor media had established over the centuries.  Essentially, the piece asks whether or not the power of canonization innate to the practice of portraiture has been reduced or expanded by new media.

Formally, the objective with the piece is to expose the widening rift between this form of contemporary portraiture and its roots in commemorative portraiture by contextualizing selected video blog portraits within an archaic and somewhat ironic realm of tribute.  The piece itself consists of five wooden handmade frames (12.5”x10”) that have been coated in etched copper and brass plates.  The plates have been acid etched using a process similar to most methods of circuit board etching, thereby uniting the materials’ connection to contemporary practices of fabrication.  The etchings themselves depict classical framing iconography derived from pre-photographic eras wherein the subject of a (painted) portrait was intended to have commemorative or honorary value; an aspect that seems to have been perverted or at the very least watered down by this new method of portrait making.  Moreover, the etched framing iconography subtly morphs into arguably more familiar icons that traditionally decorate circuit boards.

Housed inside of the frames are tablet computers that play looped animations ranging from eight seconds in length to forty two seconds.  Four of the animations (subjects) are hand-drawn portraits of randomly selected video-bloggers from YouTube.  The stills reflect a disparity between the identity projected from a video and that of the identity projected by a two-dimensional portrait, and yet candid shreds of the subject’s honesty and vulnerability shine through the abstracted stills.  A single subject is not animated, but instead she remains a single screenshot that attempts to articulate the minute and rare beauty privy to this select medium of portraiture; all the while referencing the medium of photographic portraiture that exists somewhere between a hand fabricated portrait and a video portrait.  Altogether, as each ‘portrait’ plays endlessly, ones eyes are fervently pulled in every direction as the viewer attempts to simultaneously digest each of the portraits.  This particular action replicates the sensation of binging on Internet personalities and identities, leaving one commonly feeling over-stimulated and under-impressed by the individuals featured therein.

Display Table #1

Wood, plexiglas, fans, hardware, Basic stamp
2011
Artwork by [user-name]

Display Table #1 is a free standing artwork, which consists of a wooden display table with a plexiglas case on top.  In traditional gallery scenarios, objects would be placed in the case for safe viewing. In this piece a grid matrix of computer fans are installed to the plexi case facing inward.  The case now become the "art objet". 

Television

Video screens, electronics, wood
2010
Artwork by [user-name]

Dislocation of vision has become a prevalent attribute of observation. Webcams, live network feeds, and cameras on mobile phones make it possible to see many locations simultaneously. Maps with street view enable virtual travel.   Social networks keep friends continuously connected regardless of place. Personal vision is no longer restricted to ones immediate surroundings.  

Our two eyes have become many eyes that are able to visually travel along paths through space and time.   Our close personal affects can comfortably exist in many disparate sites. As this continues, physical location loses its importance altogether and becomes no more than a trivial afterthought. 

Schrödinger v. Cat

Rubber, wood, computer with custom software, video projector, LCD display
2012
Rob Gonsalves: Schrödinger v. Cat

Schrödinger v. Cat is an interactive video installation that allows visitors to run experiments to test the famous quantum physics paradox devised by Austrian physicist Erwin Schrödinger. In 1935, Schrödinger proposed a thought experiment to illustrate what he saw as a problem with the current theory of quantum mechanics of his time, the Copenhagen interpretation, as applied to everyday objects. The scenario presents a cat that might be alive or dead, depending on an earlier random event.

To run the experiment, press the large Setup button on the control panel. This starts an animated sequence that shows the apparatus being prepared for the experiment. Next, use the buttons and knob to indicate the subject of the experiment (either a cat or Schrödinger himself) and the quantum mechanics model (the Copenhagen interpretation, the many worlds interpretation, or the Hanna-Barbera interpretation).

Pressing the Start button runs the experiment for 60 seconds. During the run you can observe the interaction of the subject with the apparatus. Note that you (and other viewers in the gallery) are unobtrusively omniscient; you do not change the quantum state by observing the experiment. After the run, the cover of the chamber is opened to reveal the experiment to the giant eyeball overhead. This act of this "observation" affects the outcome of the experiment, to reveal if the physicist or cat is alive or dead.Watch on YouTube

Copenhagen Interpretation

In the Copenhagen interpretation, a system stops being a superposition of states and becomes either one or the other when an observation takes place. [Niels Bohr - The Physical Principles of the Quantum Theory, 1930]

Many-Worlds Interpretation

In the many-worlds interpretation, both alive and dead states of the cat persist after the box is opened, but are decoherent from each other. In other words, when the box is opened, the observer and the already-dead cat split into an observer looking at a box with a dead cat, and an observer looking at a box with a live cat. [Hugh Everett Theory of the Universal Wavefunction, Thesis, Princeton University, (1956, 1973), pp 1-140]

Hanna-Barbera Interpretation

The Hanna-Barbera interpretation of quantum mechanics generally follows the accepted laws of physics — unless it is funnier otherwise. For example, any violent rearrangement of feline matter is impermanent. Cats heal fast and/or have an infinite number of lives. [ACME Journal of Cartoon Physics, 10/94; V.18 #7 p.12, 1980]

Undulum

cast acrylic, wood, aluminum, neoprene foam, motor, phenolic laminate, steel
2011
Artwork by [user-name]

I’ve long been fascinated with the segmented structures of larvae and of spinal forms and their ability to express elegant motion through waveforms and writhing. Undulum is the first attempt in a series of sculptures under development inspired by sinuous motion in nature.

The mechanism of Undulum is deceptively simple and consists of a helically shaped rod that rotates within a flexible sheath, which in turn is anchored. A second, outer, sheath is built of translucent acrylic shapes held apart by preloaded flexible foam spacers and is also anchored. As the rod rotates within the core of the sculpture, the outer sheath rides the convolutions of the inner sheath as it contorts to follow the changing shape of the rod within.

See video

Campaign Horse

wood, basketball, guy-wires, video projector, 3-axis accelerometer, computer with custom software
2011
Artwork by [user-name]

Campaign Horse is an interactive video installation that allows the visitor to participate in a modified version of the basketball game "Horse". This version of the game pits Team Blue against Team Red, using actual caustic insults from the recent national elections.

In the original schoolyard game Horse, the objective is to get your opponent labeled a horse, one letter at a time, by making basketball shots. The insult start with an “h”, then “ho”, “hor”, “hors”, and finally progresses to when player is labeled a “horse”, which ends the game. Unlike the standard game, in Campaign Horse the ensuing insults are not initially known, but are revealed through the course of the game. All insults in the game were uttered (if not shouted) by rival candidates in the vitriolic 2010 congressional elections.

There are two main visual components in Campaign Horse, a projected screen and a physical basketball suspended by guy-wires. The screen shows the following components:

  • A list of insults from previous rounds, for Team Blue and for Team Red
  • A reference map showing Blue States and Red States
  • A basket ball hoop and net
  • The current insults in play, which mark progress in the game

The basketball is the means of interaction with the piece. The ball is tethered by two guy-wires and can be tossed by visitors in the direction of the net. Although the guy-wires will prevent the ball from travelling far, there is a 3-axis accelerometer in the ball. This sends a signal to the controlling computer, triggering a virtual ball to travel towards the net. A physics simulation will determine if the ball goes through the hoop or not. Note that, as an aesthetic touch, the net is rendered using an intricate spring-model simulation for a realistic look.

As the game goes on, the players alternate shots. If Team Red makes a shot, then a new letter is revealed in the insult against Team Red. If Team Blue makes a shot, then a red insult letter is revealed. This play continues until one of the insults is fully revealed which ends the round, and a new round starts. Note that the opposing insults always have the same number of letters in each round. Also note that sound effects can be heard when the ball hits the backboard, bounces off the rim, and swishes through the net.

When Campaign Horse has been idle for a while, (i.e. if there have been no players interacting with the piece for five minutes), the installation enters “demo” mode. In this mode, the system runs as if people are playing the game, automatically tossing balls and revealing insults. If new players come and interact with the basketball, the system snaps back into interactive mode, proceeding with a new game.

By interacting with Campaign Horse, perhaps visitors will get a sense of what it is like to have unfounded insults and accusations directed against them. There is the added benefit of being able to hurl some insults right back at your opponent.

The Big Dripper

eight oscillating pumps, tubing, sink, wood, steel, UV LEDs, Arduino Pro microcontrollers, electronics, water, fluorescein dye
2011
Artwork by [user-name]

The Big Dripper is a concept based on Harold Edgerton's Piddler. Edgerton's Piddler, also known as a "Time Fountain", uses a stroboscopic light source to highlight individual drops of water in a constant stream of liquid. With the strobe off, the stream looks like a solid cylinder of falling water. With the strobe on, and correctly synchronized with the actuation of the pump, the individual drips of water that compose the stream are exposed. The drips appear to hang in space as if frozen in time. By modulating the phase relationship between the frequency of the pump and the frequency of the strobe, the device can generate optical illusions of motion. For example, the individual drops can appear to fall slowly, or even crawl upwards.

The Big Dripper was featured on Hack A Day!

http://hackaday.com/2011/03/11/water-droplet-sculpture-using-leds-and-arduino/

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